Whitehall-Coplay Press

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Revisiting the first Northampton Press

Wednesday, November 29, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Today, I am reading the Sept. 3, 1998, first copy of the Northampton Press — a day when my first Remembering column appeared in the newspaper. Publisher Fred Masenheimer and first editor Marcia White were in Northampton hoping The Press would receive a warm welcome from the community. We all know the positive answer!

The Northampton police chief was Richard Fenstermaker, and Carole Simcoe opened a business in the old Lyric Theatre on Main Street. The Lyric in the past was a vaudeville theater, tavern, luncheonette, billiard room and bowling alley.

Cement Worker of the Month

Tuesday, November 21, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Local News

Dean D. Haftl Keystone Cement

Mr. Dean Haftl was raised on the family farm in Moore Township. The entire family was active with 4-H Clubs. He graduated from Northampton High School in 1978, saying, “I was given a good educational foundation for life.”

Starting at Keystone in 1978, Dean was hired by manager Franklin Silfies.

He said, “I am proud to say our family — my grandfather, father and sister — have proudly worked at Keystone for over 100 years. Old-timers John Flamisch, Harold Newton and Tom Yost have also shared their work experiences with me.”

American Legion gets new home, new name

Wednesday, November 1, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

When I drive past the American Legion posts in Northampton, Coplay, Catasauqua and Fullerton, I “remember” the Dough Boys returning home from France after World War I.

The American Legion was incorporated by an act of Congress in 1919. Its purpose was to foster Americanism, uphold the Constitution, preserve the memories of the World War I veterans and promote good citizenship — worthy goals indeed!

Cement Worker of the Month

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Local News

Michael C. Miller

Mr. Michael Miller was reared in Nazareth, graduating from Nazareth High School in 1986, where he played tackle on the football team and was a heavyweight wrestler on the Blue Eagles championship wrestling squad.

He recalled, “I especially admired coach Ray Nunamaker and Larry Oberly, my social studies teacher.”

Michael attended Unity College in Maine and studied conservation and law enforcement. He used this training and served on the Coopersburg Police Department for seven years.

A prolific weightlifter, Michael owned Nazareth Barbell for 12 years.

Coplay Cement Company and the Trump connection

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

In this third column, Mr. Larry Oberly and this writer are over at the old Essroc Cement office, now Lehigh Hanson. Essroc was formerly Coplay Cement, so we were given permission to search for some old Coplay history.

There are records for the early Coplay Cement Company, which was founded in 1866. Many are handwritten. We found many interesting flashbacks to the company’s past. Among the photographs we found were many projects in New York City, Maryland, New Jersey and other East Coast cities that used Coplay Cement.

Cement Worker of the Month

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Local News

Kevin Toth

Mr. Kevin Toth was reared in Nesquehoning, graduating from Panther Valley High School in 1984, where he was a member of the wrestling team. He learned the cobbler trade from his brother and became skilled in shoe repair, working in their shops in Lansford and managing the Lehighton Plaza location. When the business closed, he was employed by J.E. Morgan Knitting in Hometown.

Coplay Cement Company supported the war effort

Wednesday, September 6, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Recently, Larry Oberly and this writer visited Essroc, now Lehigh Hanson, in Nazareth, to look at some old records of the Coplay Cement Company. Coplay constructed the plant, which became Essroc on 1978.

We found a treasure of historic photographs. The photos in today’s column were taken in 1944.

During World War II, the cement companies in our area continued operation, but their machine shops took on extra responsibilities. The War Production Board directed the companies to utilize their shops to manufacture equipment to support the war.

Report card from 120 years ago

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

“Remember” when you were a student in elementary and high school? For some of us, that’s a long, long time ago. The day most dreaded was report card time. Would our parents be pleased with our effort and achievement?

One of my teacher friends at the Northampton Middle School shared with me a report card from the Siegfrieds Grammar School — the year, 1896-97.

Siegfried was one of the three villages that would later, in 1909, be incorporated as the Borough of Northampton. Siegfried was basically located in the borough’s present first ward.

Indian Trail Park: long-ago summers

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Today I return to the old Indian Trail Park in Pennsville. The year is 1947. My father had just purchased his first post-war automobile: a 1947 Plymouth. We drove to the park on a sunny summer Sunday to enjoy the day.

Back in the Revolutionary War era, an old grist mill, which ground wheat, oats and corn, was still on site but no longer in operation. Community groups attempted to preserve the old mill, but their efforts were unsuccessful.

Many summertime memories made at Indian Trail Park

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Recently, some of my loyal readers requested I recall Indian Trail Park in Pennsville. As a youngster, it was a treat to visit the park. My parents would visit the park on many Sunday afternoons. There was always plenty of activity. I wonder how many of my readers have been at the park!

My friends at the Lehigh Township Historical Society wrote a great book of Lehigh Township giving us an accurate history of the park far superior to my youthful memories.