Whitehall-Coplay Press

Friday, June 22, 2018

Healthy Geezer: Meniere’s disease

Saturday, June 16, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. A friend of mine has Meniere’s disease. What is it exactly?

Meniere’s disease is an inner-ear disorder that produces a group of symptoms including vertigo, a spinning sensation that can lead to nausea and vomiting. Meniere’s usually occurs in only one ear.

The disease was named after French physician Prosper Ménière, who first described it in 1861. Meniere’s main symptoms are:

Attacks of vertigo without warning that last 20 minutes to more than two hours.

Permanent hearing loss that is suffered by most people with Meniere’s.

Healthy Geezer: from the e-mail bag

Friday, June 1, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What are the most common symptoms that you’re having a stroke?

The most common stroke symptoms include: sudden numbness, weakness, or paralysis of the face, arm or leg, usually on one side of the body; trouble talking or understanding; sudden blurred, double or decreased vision; dizziness, loss of balance or coordination; a sudden headache with a stiff neck, facial pain, pain between the eyes, vomiting or altered consciousness; confusion, or problems with memory, spatial orientation or perception.

Healthy Geezer: SAD symptoms

Friday, May 18, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I get the winter blues every year. I was wondering how many people suffer the way I do.

The medical term for winter depression is Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Symptoms usually begin in late fall or early winter and go away by summer. A less common type of depression occurs in the summer. SAD has been linked to a biochemical imbalance in the brain prompted by shorter daylight hours and a lack of sunlight in winter.

Healthy Geezer: PAD risk

Thursday, May 10, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My toe nails and leg hair don’t seem to be growing as fast as they used to. Is this age-related or is it something else?

It could be caused by something harmless, but it is possible that it is a little-known symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). If I were you, I’d go to a doctor for a check-up.

PAD usually affects legs, but also can affect blood vessels to your head, arms, kidneys, and stomach. Your chances of getting PAD increase with age. About one in five over 65 has PAD.

Healthy Geezer: Shoulder problems

Friday, April 27, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

First of two parts

Q. You can settle a bet for me. Who gets shoulder problems more often, athletes or seniors?

Athletes such as pitchers, tennis players and swimmers are especially susceptible to shoulder problems because of their repetitive overhead motions. However, shoulder problems are most likely to victimize people older than 60. You can deduce that, as a group, old athletes are at the highest risk of shoulder injury.

Healthy Geezer: Three questions

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What percentage of older men have erectile dysfunction (ED)?

The incidence of ED increases with age. Between 15 and 25 percent of 65-year-old men experience this problem. In older men, ED usually has a physical cause, such as a drug side effect, disease or injury. Anything that damages the nerves or impairs blood flow in the penis can cause ED.

The following are some leading causes of erectile dysfunction: diabetes, high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), prostate surgery, hormone imbalance, alcohol and drug abuse.

Healthy Geezer: stuttering

Thursday, April 12, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My four-year-old grandson has begun to stutter. It upsets me and I don’t know how to handle it.

It should be reassuring to you to know that about five percent of children stutter for a period of about six months. Three-quarters of these children recover before they mature. About one percent of adults stutter.

Meanwhile, knowing how to talk to your grandson will help both of you.

Healthy Geezer: Here comes the sun

Friday, April 6, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Second of two parts

Most public health messages have focused on the hazards of too much sun exposure. But there is some sunny news about the sun.

Sunlight increases the body’s vitamin D supply. In seniors, vitamin D protects against osteoporosis, a disorder in which the bones become increasingly brittle. Vitamin D also protects against cancer, heart disease, and other maladies.

There are other benefits a daily dose of sunlight.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that affects people when they don’t get enough sunlight.