Whitehall-Coplay Press

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Register to attend L.V. Food Policy Council meeting

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 by SHARI NOCTOR in Opinion

I recently attended the 2017 Anti-Hunger Conference in Washington, D.C., which was presented by Feeding America (No Kid Hungry) and the Food Research & Action Center (FRAC). More than 1,300 people attended, including food banks, faith-based groups, educators, USDA representatives, attorneys, Boys & Girls Clubs and YMCA representatives, plus many more people who work to feed Americans daily. It was a real eye opener.

FRAC was very strong on the upcoming farm bill legislation. The following is taken from a handout given at the conference on SNAP, one of the programs cited to be cut.

GUEST VIEW

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

Political experience a must for president

I wonder how the vast majority of President Donald Trump voters and supporters feel about his first couple of months in the White House.

I’ve been pondering such, as the major campaign promises and policy initiatives he confidently said would become a reality, have not materialized — at least not yet.

I admit, I did not vote for Trump. However, after he was elected, I told myself and a select few friends, perhaps we should give him a chance.

another view

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 by LINDA WOJCIECHOWSKI in Opinion

Fishing: It’s not just about dinner

“Fishing is much more than fish. It is the great occasion when we may return to the fine simplicity of our forefathers.” — Herbert Hoover

***

I’ve only gone fishing three times in my life. The opening day of trout season in the Lehigh Valley Saturday got me to thinking, though, about the attraction and significance of the sport.

I only recall going fishing with my father one time. We were on a family vacation, and he took four of us, ranging in age from about 5 to 10, to fish along a creek bank. I was 9.

For well-being, make right move

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

I am a person who doesn’t like change.

In our fast-changing world, that’s not a good way to be, I guess — but it’s the way I am. Usually, I don’t think about the subject much, but this past weekend, three things happened that put the focus on change and got my attention.

A friend in New Jersey told me she is selling her home and car and moving to a continuing-care retirement community.

Another friend, who, for financial reasons, had moved to a senior high-rise apartment and hated his new living arrangements, died.

Too much, too little, too soon

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

What do you think of when you hear the phrase “overindulged children”? I always thought of kids who had a lot of stuff and opportunities. You know — the kind of kids who rarely hear the word “no” and seem to get everything they want. The kind who act bratty and entitled.

But a recent read of a book called “How Much Is Too Much?” by Jean Illsley Clark, Ph.D., expanded my perception of what overindulgence really is. And to my surprise, my score on a questionnaire I completed in the back of the book classified me as one who unintentionally overindulges my kids a bit.

EDITOR’S VIEW

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

Punishment for littering has to hurt in order to be effective

I remember the commercial from my childhood: a Native American standing roadside, a tear rolling down his cheek as he sees the beauty of the landscape stripped away by litter.

That public service announcement, part of the Keep America Beautiful campaign, first aired in 1971.

EDITOR’S VIEW

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

Maybe the Secret Service should watch ‘The Wild, Wild West’

During the late ’60s, and now in reruns, the television series “The Wild, Wild West” featured two Secret Service agents, James West, played by Robert Conrad, and Artemus Gordon, played by Ross Martin.

In 1999, the futuristic western, set in the late 1860s and ’70s, was made into a movie featuring Will Smith as West and Kevin Kline as Gordon.

Through the use of Jules Verne-sque gadgets and weapons, the duo were tasked with protecting the 18th president of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant, and saving the country from the evildoers of all stripes.

Another View

Wednesday, March 15, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

How altruistic are you?

Every day, someone becomes a victim of a crime. And, then there are those who risk their own lives and safety to help those in need.

When Daniel DeTurck, of Reading, Berks County, saw an Amber Alert Jan. 3 on his phone asking the public’s help to locate an infant abducted by alleged murder suspect Antonio Velazquez-Rupert, DeTurck didn’t hesitate to help.

When DeTurck, a security guard, saw a vehicle matching the description in the Amber Alert, he dialed 911 and took off after the vehicle — with no thought for his own safety or personal situation.

EDITOR’S VIEW

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 by The Press in Opinion

A very ‘Lucky’ adventure

Everyone loves a little adventure now and then, especially when you are a 3-1/2-year-old black and tan tabby named Lucky from Lower Macungie.

Oh, and did I mention he is blind?

On March 1, Lucky began his adventure around 1:15 a.m., somehow living the life of an escape artist and leaving the comforts of his home in the Ancient Oaks West development.

A flier was placed on social media sites and sent to various news outlets asking for help in locating the escapee March 2.